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Your # 1 & 2 Jobs As an Affiliate Marketer.

joeybabbs

LIFETIME MEMBER
Staff member
I hate the word "job" but as an affiliate marketer we really only have 2 main things to do.

A lot of people make their mistake right here. A lot of people think our job is to sell something.

With this in mind they start out their Affiliate Journey on the path of trying to sell.

They design really poor websites that look untrusting, and their whole mission is to sell something with overly aggressive headlines and calls to action. It's easy to think this because most training focuses on this type of stuff.

The reality is we need to sit back and think about what our main function is.

Why do you think most platforms online call us publishers?

The answer is because we are expected to produce or publish good content.

So job #1 is to produce good content and create an audience around our content that enjoys consuming it.

So what is job #2 you ask? It must be to sell something?

No our next job is to get traffic to someone else's offer. Since we are an affiliate for someone else we want to send qualified traffic to their offer and let them do the selling.

Once we grasp this concept as affiliates our whole business changes.

Producing content that users want to engage with or content that doesn't make the user feel like they are being sold to will drastically improve your conversion rates.

This is applicable to both paid traffic campaigns and seo campaigns.

This is why listicles and advertorials work well, this is why email captures and funnels work well...this is why honest product reviews work well.

People don't immediately feel like they are being sold to.

Take this concept to your next campaign and see if it helps!
 

joeybabbs

LIFETIME MEMBER
Staff member
Fair question because a lot of the campaigns I run do have pages built specific for getting conversions whether it be leads or sales - but I feel they are not traditional sales pages.

My most effective pages aren't built like a typical landing page.

My point is that landing pages built only to sell rarely work for the long term unless it is an honest review of a specific product - but even then it is content driven and requires an authority style suite that looks trustworthy.

My pages are built to either "appear" like they are a service, or they actually provide what "appears" to be useful content, or the page engages users immediately upon entering.

In my experience the pages with no "salesy" type of wordings work better. It's like putting out a path of little consumable breadcrumbs that leads the mouse to the big cookie after they leave my page. As they consume more and more of the crumbs they feel like they need more....

Here are some examples:

1. Lead Capture:

Article about all the problems insurance companies have and why most Americans are over paying.

Clicks to lead generation offer also opens a pop under tab with a free guide related where I capture emails,

Get a Detailed List of ALL Auto Insurance Quotes in Your Area & Save Thousands

ENTER EMAIL

Followed by another CPA offer tripwire then followed by tons of emails with actual blog content.


2. I am a content provider website that has tons of different listicles about cool gadgets, or ways to save money, or gift ideas, or even just cool articles that arbitrage adsense.
I send traffic to a listicle with tons of affiliate offers but it is disguised as great content. When someone clicks through my landing page I also have a pop form that collects leads at which point I send even more listicles and content to them.

3. I set up a survey style landing page that actually gets people to engage immediately so they don't leave. Once they start to engage they feel a sense of obligation to stay and finish what they started. At the end of the survey it can be an email capture or an offer that seamlessly fits into the sequence - at which point my job is over - I am not selling to them the offer owner is.
 

abdulla

Member
That's true; most people get into affiliate marketing trying to make quick money and think about it as just another business model.

That is a big problem because affiliate marketing requires one to know how to make strategic decisions and a long-term plan to be able to succeed.
 

cutredgrowthegreen

Premium Member
So articles/advertorials/content pages convert better than salesy landing pages. Should we be looking to do this across all niches/offers or are there exceptions?

I always thought people would get bored reading through a detailed article or interacting with a survey, even if provided genuinely useful or relevant information because people's attention span has been conditioned to mere seconds. Landing pages are short and to the point, sort of like tik tok videos or youtube shorts.
 

alpowerhouse

Premium Member
1. Lead Capture:

Article about all the problems insurance companies have and why most Americans are over paying.

Clicks to lead generation offer also opens a pop under tab with a free guide related where I capture emails,

Get a Detailed List of ALL Auto Insurance Quotes in Your Area & Save Thousands

ENTER EMAIL

Followed by another CPA offer tripwire then followed by tons of emails with actual blog content.
Hi @joeybabbs the pop under wouldn't be compliant if you were to run it on Bing right? Thought they have a landing page experience policy where no interruptive actions are allowed such as pop-ups, pop unders, redirects etc.

So would you run traffic to another article first?

Thanks
 

joeybabbs

LIFETIME MEMBER
Staff member
Hi @joeybabbs the pop under wouldn't be compliant if you were to run it on Bing right? Thought they have a landing page experience policy where no interruptive actions are allowed such as pop-ups, pop unders, redirects etc.

So would you run traffic to another article first?

Thanks
Correct - Bing frowns upon pounders.

It is risky to even trigger it on a click.

I have one campaign where I trigger it on a survey completion but it is likely breaking rules but was never detected in years literally.
 

alpowerhouse

Premium Member
Bing clicks through the landing pages for compliance checks
Correct - Bing frowns upon pounders.

It is risky to even trigger it on a click.

I have one campaign where I trigger it on a survey completion but it is likely breaking rules but was never detected in years literally.

Is there a good workaround?

The only one I could think of was to setup a lead magnet on that landing page first to send traffic to.
Then any other pages we send them to from emails is outside of Bing's prying eyes.

Any thing else you'd suggest @joeybabbs ? Thanks
 

joeybabbs

LIFETIME MEMBER
Staff member
Bing clicks through the landing pages for compliance checks


Is there a good workaround?

The only one I could think of was to setup a lead magnet on that landing page first to send traffic to.
Then any other pages we send them to from emails is outside of Bing's prying eyes.

Any thing else you'd suggest @joeybabbs ? Thanks
Yeah lead capture first is generally a good way to avoid any issues but it can definitely be challenging making a funnel profitable...its key to have a good one time offer after they email submit.
 

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